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1996 Mustang (SN95) ---> 2.3t swap

For timing, you're likely best off trying to find that info from Volvo guys or from large bore 4v low compression (or whatever yours is) import guys to use as a starting point if you want more than a "best guess". Don never ran very high boost so his info isn't likely overly helpful. Other option is to just start it real low (like pull 12+ degrees from a normal 2.3 table), put it on a dyno, and you'll know within the first 5 pulls or so. Don't assume it will need/want more timing with E85. We've found many applications actually don't (and those that do only want a few degrees more than 93 octane). Wes recently tuned a Miata (similar head design) on 93 and then E85 and used the flex fuel sensor so it could blend between the two fuels at any ratio and after dialing in the timing table on a dyno, the final values for both fuels ended up nearly identical.
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(07-22-2020, 07:03 AM)Stinger Wrote:  For timing, you're likely best off trying to find that info from Volvo guys or from large bore 4v low compression (or whatever yours is) import guys to use as a starting point if you want more than a "best guess". Don never ran very high boost so his info isn't likely overly helpful. Other option is to just start it real low (like pull 12+ degrees from a normal 2.3 table), put it on a dyno, and you'll know within the first 5 pulls or so. Don't assume it will need/want more timing with E85. We've found many applications actually don't (and those that do only want a few degrees more than 93 octane). Wes recently tuned a Miata (similar head design) on 93 and then E85 and used the flex fuel sensor so it could blend between the two fuels at any ratio and after dialing in the timing table on a dyno, the final values for both fuels ended up nearly identical.
Thanks for that advice and it makes perfect sense. I'll try to track down the comparable table to work with. 

Have a great day!
Michael
1996 Ford Mustang
2.5t Folvo w/ HE351VE, MS3X, & TKO500

1958 Plymouth Savoy
Flathead 6 and 3-on-the-tree

2018 Audi RS3
2.5t, AWD
11.23 @ 121 mph
Reply

Since I first got this car running (15+ years ago), the bump steer sleeves were just barely short enough to make the necessary adjustments to the alignment's toe. Today, I cut and rewelded the sleeves from 5" down to 4". Things fit much better now. Next week, I'll get the car insured and tagged and take it in for an alignment. Then, I'll start tuning things. 

I cut a 1" section out of each sleeve, welded them back together, and welded a piece of 3/4" steel pipe over the cut/re-welded sleeve. My current shop runs off a generator and it makes my already struggling welding abilities a little more challenging because the generator has to get up to RPMs before the welder welds correctly. That leaves two or three seconds of bad welding settings.

   
   
   
   

I also installed a lighter spring in the wastegate. The one I previously had was setup for about 30 psi and made tuning things pretty challenging because I couldn't 'creep' into the boost. That, the timing (maybe), and my impatience to get into the boost were to blame for the blown head gasket that caused the car to sit for the last year. I hope this spring opens around 5 - 10 psi. The E85 should have a lot more tolerance to get things tuned correctly. 

Fingers crossed...

Have a great day!
Michael
1996 Ford Mustang
2.5t Folvo w/ HE351VE, MS3X, & TKO500

1958 Plymouth Savoy
Flathead 6 and 3-on-the-tree

2018 Audi RS3
2.5t, AWD
11.23 @ 121 mph
Reply

After the alignment this last Thursday, I've been driving the car around for a few days and things are going well. The wastegate spring opens up at 3psi. It's a good thing we can run more than 3psi of boost in these things... The timing table I was using was too aggressive for the 91 octane, but is working fine on the E85.

Oil Temps
After some hard driving, the oil pressure starts dropping. If I don't beat on it, the oil pressure stays up much longer. I think my oil temps are too high and causing the decreased oil pressure. Recall that this block has concrete to within 1" of the deck. I've ordered a 29"x14"x2.5" oil cooler and oil thermostat. The install shouldn't be too complicated because I'm already running a remote oil filter with 12AN lines. Once I get the oil cooler and thermostat installed, I'll determine the fitting requirements and get those ordered. I'll also install a temp gauge (gauge and/or sensor for Megasquirt) so I can keep a closer eye on things. I feel good that'll allow me to start turning the boost up.

I learned I have a load dyno in town and will likely spend an hour or two on that getting things dialed in a little closer. Until I get the oil temps controlled, I don't think it's worth it to get the car on a dyno.

Have a great day, all!
Michael
1996 Ford Mustang
2.5t Folvo w/ HE351VE, MS3X, & TKO500

1958 Plymouth Savoy
Flathead 6 and 3-on-the-tree

2018 Audi RS3
2.5t, AWD
11.23 @ 121 mph
Reply

The block fill shouldn't be causing oil temp or pressure issues. Matt and I did drag week in his car with the block fill and it was fine.

With E85 you can have too much timing (hurts power and bearings) and not detonate. So just because it's not detonating doesn't mean it's fine. It may be fine, but it's not necessarily fine just because it's not detonating.
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(08-09-2020, 08:41 PM)Stinger Wrote:  The block fill shouldn't be causing oil temp or pressure issues. Matt and I did drag week in his car with the block fill and it was fine.

I do hope you're wrong Smile. I've had filled blocks (even 2.3 engines) without this issue and I agree that not every filled block has oil temp or CLT issues. Nevertheless, a filled block does reduce the BTUs (heat) being transferred away from the engine (block, etc) to the cooling system. Some of those reduced BTUs should help cool the engine oil. This specific block was unintentionally filled too high (IMHO). My cooling system capacity is about 1.25 gallons (OEM radiator for 1996 Ford Mustang). While I'm not experiencing any problems with the water temps, that could change once I run the engine harder (boost, RPM, back-to-back runs, etc).

I didn't explain how I arrived at the hypothesis (oil temp problem) in my previous post because it's not a terribly scientific approach and I don't want to spread misinformation. Either way, though, I'll post up the results of the oil cooler install. Hopefully, it's not wasted $$$... It was my wife's birthday present to me Smile.

(08-09-2020, 08:41 PM)Stinger Wrote:  With E85 you can have too much timing (hurts power and bearings) and not detonate. So just because it's not detonating doesn't mean it's fine. It may be fine, but it's not necessarily fine just because it's not detonating.

Yes, agreed and thanks for clarifying that.

Thanks and have a great day!
Michael
1996 Ford Mustang
2.5t Folvo w/ HE351VE, MS3X, & TKO500

1958 Plymouth Savoy
Flathead 6 and 3-on-the-tree

2018 Audi RS3
2.5t, AWD
11.23 @ 121 mph
Reply

After receiving the PWR oil cooler (29 x 14-3/4 x 2-1/2) and Earls oil thermostat, removed the front bumper and radiator to mock things up. The oil cooler is slighter larger than my radiator and looked pretty simple to mount. I had a local machine shop weld some aluminum angle on the oil cooler and a 12an and 10an fitting.

This evening, after getting everything back from the machine shop, I mounted the oil cooler and oil thermostat. The oil cooler had a clearance issue I failed to recognize and required a slightly different mounting method. I ended up using some "Z" brackets I had laying around that worked great. I used three "Z" brackets on the top and bottom to mount the oil cooler to the radiator. Essentially, the oil cooler is 'hanging' its weight on the radiator. 

   

There is a set of angle welded on the top and bottom of the front and back. The back angle is 3/4" and is for mounting the oil cooler to the radiator. The front angle is 1/2" and is for mounting the A/C condenser...when I add A/C back to the car. 

   

Here's the setup mounted in the car.

   

   

After getting the radiator/oil cooler mounted, I shifted my attention to the oil thermostat. Since I'm already running a remote oil filter and have 12an hoses coming off the engine to the oil filter adapter, adding the oil thermostat is a little simpler. I mounted the oil thermostat to some 1/8" aluminum to mount and screwed the plate to car's structure tucked up in the driver's side fender. At some point, I'll weld some threaded weld-ins into the frame for more secure mounting. My welder doesn't appreciate running of the generator and I didn't want to mess with welding tonight. 

   

Now that everything is mounted, I have ordered the hose ends and hose. I want to add oil temperature and oil pressure to Megasquirt and ordered a Standard Motors TX73 temperature sensor and a 0 - 100psi pressure transducer for the oil pressure (model number: LEPAZA60120 part number: 9687283011). I specifically ordered these because they have 1/8" NPT threads instead of the larger threads these types of sensors normally come with. In the last photo, the temp is on top and is measuring the oil temperature coming out of the engine and the pressure is on bottom and is measuring the oil going back to the engine. I don't like how far down the oil pressure hangs and have ordered an 1/8" 90* fitting. 

Temp Sensor: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000C7...UTF8&psc=1

Oil Pressure: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0748B...UTF8&psc=1

I was also able to find the wires I was previously planning to use for EGT and a second external MAP sensor that I'll repurpose for these two sensors. 

Have a great day!
Michael
1996 Ford Mustang
2.5t Folvo w/ HE351VE, MS3X, & TKO500

1958 Plymouth Savoy
Flathead 6 and 3-on-the-tree

2018 Audi RS3
2.5t, AWD
11.23 @ 121 mph
Reply

Michael, awesome project you have here. I am interested to see how this oil cooler works out for you.
417 RWHP & 378 lbft
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Taking advantage of warm weather, I finished the oil cooler installation this evening. That includes the oil cooler, oil cooler thermostat, oil pressure sensor, oil temperature sensor, and associated wiring and hoses. I think the oil temperature sensor is reading correctly in Tunerstudio while the oil pressure is not reading correctly. I'll do some research on setting up that channel correctly. For now, I'll continue watching the mechanical oil pressure gauge. For the oil temperature, I need to pull out the infrared thermometer to confirm the readings are correct, though. The oil cooler is HUGE (larger than my radiator) and shouldn't have any trouble oil temps under control. 

For a few laps around the section and driving the car home from the shop, I got the car up to operating temperature and made many pulls to 6k rpms. The oil pressure is behaving much better now! I'll keep cruising and tuning it around town to confirm all is well and will slowly increase the boost levels as the tuning permits. 

Have a great day!
Michael
1996 Ford Mustang
2.5t Folvo w/ HE351VE, MS3X, & TKO500

1958 Plymouth Savoy
Flathead 6 and 3-on-the-tree

2018 Audi RS3
2.5t, AWD
11.23 @ 121 mph
Reply

I've been driving the car around town and into Mexico for some speed bursts. The oil pressure problem is definitely resolved now. With the car boosting to 10 psi without issue, I needed to put the MBC on the other side of the wastegate diaphragm to get more boost. When I did that, I had the MBC set incorrectly and the car boosted to 23 psi before I let off. At 23 psi, my duty cycle (9.9 AFR) was at 54% on E85 and my fuel pressure was keeping up. I do expect to reach the limits of the single 255 lph fuel pump and have a second fuel pump ready to install. 

With the spirited driving, I have lost two alternator belts over the last week and need to address my weak alternator mount. 

My current setup is pivoting the 3g alternator off the small tab. I'm pretty sure it's flexing (and maybe some strange harmonics) and causing the belt to fling off with RPM. 
   

This is a chunk of aluminum I bought (and started building the mount a while back). It started off at 1" thick by 4" wide by 8" long. 
   

The mounting surface that attaches to the motor plate needed offset to align the alternator and crank pulleys (belt and pulley alignment). At first, I used a cutoff wheel and saw-zaw to get the rough shape cut out. Then, I used a rough grinding wheel to get within ~0.030". I used dial calipers to confirm the measurement along the entire surface. Then, I used a sanding wheel to sneak up on the final dimension. Again, I used dial calipers to constantly check the measurement. 
   

After doing all this, the pulley alignment still wasn't lining up and I needed to take more material off. Realizing the importance of that mounting surface (parallel and straight), I was trying to brainstorm a better way to do this. If only I had a mill (I sold mine about two years ago)... I ended up pulling out my router table. While a little scary, it worked well and made a reasonably smooth cut as long as I went slow enough. Seeing how well this worked, I'll probably buy a couple 1/2" end mills instead of using my wood cutters. 
   

This is where things ended. The pulley alignment is good. I will profile the front of the mount. 
   

I also bought a belt tensioner from the local parts store. Since it's at the shop, I don't have the part number, but it has about 3" of standoff and will only need shimmed about a 1/4". The lever arm is also longer than normal so it can reach the belt without issue. The driver's side of the motor plate is pretty crowded (intake manifold behind the plate, R&P below the plate, and timing belt), but I should be able to make it all fit. At worst, the tensioner will get nixed. I have no doubt this mount will flex significantly less than the previous mount and that's 'probably' enough to resolve the problem. 

Have a great day!
Michael
1996 Ford Mustang
2.5t Folvo w/ HE351VE, MS3X, & TKO500

1958 Plymouth Savoy
Flathead 6 and 3-on-the-tree

2018 Audi RS3
2.5t, AWD
11.23 @ 121 mph
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