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1996 Mustang (SN95) ---> 2.3t swap

For timing, you're likely best off trying to find that info from Volvo guys or from large bore 4v low compression (or whatever yours is) import guys to use as a starting point if you want more than a "best guess". Don never ran very high boost so his info isn't likely overly helpful. Other option is to just start it real low (like pull 12+ degrees from a normal 2.3 table), put it on a dyno, and you'll know within the first 5 pulls or so. Don't assume it will need/want more timing with E85. We've found many applications actually don't (and those that do only want a few degrees more than 93 octane). Wes recently tuned a Miata (similar head design) on 93 and then E85 and used the flex fuel sensor so it could blend between the two fuels at any ratio and after dialing in the timing table on a dyno, the final values for both fuels ended up nearly identical.
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(07-22-2020, 07:03 AM)Stinger Wrote:  For timing, you're likely best off trying to find that info from Volvo guys or from large bore 4v low compression (or whatever yours is) import guys to use as a starting point if you want more than a "best guess". Don never ran very high boost so his info isn't likely overly helpful. Other option is to just start it real low (like pull 12+ degrees from a normal 2.3 table), put it on a dyno, and you'll know within the first 5 pulls or so. Don't assume it will need/want more timing with E85. We've found many applications actually don't (and those that do only want a few degrees more than 93 octane). Wes recently tuned a Miata (similar head design) on 93 and then E85 and used the flex fuel sensor so it could blend between the two fuels at any ratio and after dialing in the timing table on a dyno, the final values for both fuels ended up nearly identical.
Thanks for that advice and it makes perfect sense. I'll try to track down the comparable table to work with. 

Have a great day!
Michael
1996 Ford Mustang
2.5t Folvo w/ HE351VE, MS3X, & TKO500

1958 Plymouth Savoy
Flathead 6 and 3-on-the-tree

2018 Audi RS3
2.5t, AWD
11.23 @ 121 mph
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Since I first got this car running (15+ years ago), the bump steer sleeves were just barely short enough to make the necessary adjustments to the alignment's toe. Today, I cut and rewelded the sleeves from 5" down to 4". Things fit much better now. Next week, I'll get the car insured and tagged and take it in for an alignment. Then, I'll start tuning things. 

I cut a 1" section out of each sleeve, welded them back together, and welded a piece of 3/4" steel pipe over the cut/re-welded sleeve. My current shop runs off a generator and it makes my already struggling welding abilities a little more challenging because the generator has to get up to RPMs before the welder welds correctly. That leaves two or three seconds of bad welding settings.

   
   
   
   

I also installed a lighter spring in the wastegate. The one I previously had was setup for about 30 psi and made tuning things pretty challenging because I couldn't 'creep' into the boost. That, the timing (maybe), and my impatience to get into the boost were to blame for the blown head gasket that caused the car to sit for the last year. I hope this spring opens around 5 - 10 psi. The E85 should have a lot more tolerance to get things tuned correctly. 

Fingers crossed...

Have a great day!
Michael
1996 Ford Mustang
2.5t Folvo w/ HE351VE, MS3X, & TKO500

1958 Plymouth Savoy
Flathead 6 and 3-on-the-tree

2018 Audi RS3
2.5t, AWD
11.23 @ 121 mph
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