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which way to turn rods
#11

Drew I'll look tomorrow , mine are at work . I'll see how they are . But I do believe they are on the same side .
Billy
What do u get when u feed booost to a dinosaur???? Booostalotopuss.T for Turbo-S for Supercharged.
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#12

The tangs are on the same side .
Billy
What do u get when u feed booost to a dinosaur???? Booostalotopuss.T for Turbo-S for Supercharged.
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#13

.
The "squirt holes" in OEM rods are intended to provide increased oil to the cyl walls on the major-thrust side, where the vast majority of side-thrust takes place. If no hole exists, the orientation of the rod shouldn't make any difference. The only exceptions are with some ."V-architecture" engines, where the beam is slightly offset (front-to-rear), relative to the big-end "saddle". 

This was done to center the small end of the rod between the piston's pin bosses on certain engines where the bank-to-bank bore spacing wasn't precisely located over the ideal rod position on the crank pin (like the even-fire-converted .90-degree GM V6's with offset-ground .rod journals). Clear as mud? Wink  AFAIK, however, no such offsets were ever used on inline engines.
Placerville, California
(former)  '78 2.3T Courier w/blow-thru carb ~ (current)  '87 2.3T Ranger w/PiMP’d EFI
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#14

Thanks. I didn't think it mattered since there is no chamfer to orient with a siamesed next to it ala V engine. Since the squirters point torwards the PS, I put the bearing tangs on the drivers side like the stock rods appear to be.
Building (notso) cheap turbo Lima power!  450 HP or bust!
Cordova,TN
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